Month: January 2023

Ielts academic writing describing process and procedures

An example of this can be seen in this diagram from a past IELTS process diagram question about the manufacture of bricks.

These connectors are the same you would use to write a graph over time when you explain a series of changes.

Ielts academic writing describing process and procedures

It is less common in the writing test, but sometimes you will get an IELTS process diagram to describe.

However, there are different types of task 1 (line graphs, pie charts, maps etc) and each requires knowledge of a certain type of language.

What is an IELTS Process Diagram?

The diagram illustrates the process that is used to manufacture bricks for the building industry.

Summarize the information by selecting and reporting the main features and make comparisons where relevant.

IELTS Process Diagram Brick Making

IELTS Process Diagram – Brick Making

A process will have a number of stages that are in time order. So you should start at the beginning, and describe each stage through to the last one.

In the example above, this is fairly clear. It begins with the digging of the clay, and ends with delivery.

Processes are not always this clear, and you may have to look more carefully to spot the beginning, and there may also be two things happening at the same time.

So it is important that you look at other sample processes to get a good understanding of how they can vary.

Introduce the Diagram

The diagram explains the way in which bricks are made for the building industry.

As you can see, this has been taken from the question, but it has not been copied. You need to write it in your own words.

Highlight the Main Points

An IELTS process diagram is different to a line, bar, pie chart or table in that there are not usually key changes or trends to identify. However, you should still give an overview of what is taking place.

The ‘public band descriptors’ state that to achieve a band 6 or more for ‘task response’ the student must provide an overview in a task 1.

As there are no trends to comment on, you can make a comment on, for example, the number of stages in the process and how it begins and ends:

Overall, there are eight stages in the process, beginning with the digging up of clay and culminating in delivery.

Give the Detail

Now you need to explain the IELTS process diagram, and there are two key aspects of language associated with this:

A process is a series of events, one taking place after the other. Therefore, to connect your stages, you should use ‘time connectors’.

Here is the rest of the answer with the time connectors highlighted (notice that you simply go from the beginning to the end of the process):

To begin , the clay used to make the bricks is dug up from the ground by a large digger. This clay is then placed onto a metal grid, which is used to break up the clay into smaller pieces. A roller assists in this process.

Following this , sand and water are added to the clay, and this mixture is turned into two differing types of brick by either placing it into a mould or using a wire cutter. Next , these bricks are placed in an oven to dry for 24 – 48 hours.

In the subsequent stage , the bricks go through a heating and cooling process. They are heated in a kiln at a moderate and then a high temperature (ranging from 200c to 1300c), followed by a cooling process in a chamber for 2 – 3 days. Finally , the bricks are packed and delivered to their destinations.

These connectors are the same you would use to write a graph over time when you explain a series of changes.

** If you use before, this means that you will be mentioning a later stage before an earlier stage, so you need to use it carefully. If you can use it properly though, it will get noticed.

Before being dried in the oven, the mixture is turned into bricks by either placing it into a mould or using a wire cutter.

When we describe an IELTS process that involves humans (a man-made process as opposed to a natural one), the focus is on the activities, NOT the person doing them.

When this is the case, we use the passive voice, not the active. For a natural process, such as the life-cycle of a frog, we use active as there is not a person doing the activity in the diagram.

This is a brief explanation of how to use the passive voice, but if you are new or unsure about using it, you should do some further study and practice.

In the active voice (as above), the digger is doing the verb i.e. the digger is doing the digging.

When we use the passive voice, we make the object (the clay) the subject, and make the subject (the digger) the object. We also add in the verb ‘to be’ and the past participle (or Verb 3).

So throughout most of your description for your IELTS process diagram, you should be using the passive voice.

This is difficult as some verbs cannot take the passive. For example, ‘to go’ cannot be passive, so it is kept in the active voice:

This is why you need to make sure you practice the passive so you know exactly how to use it.

Also, as you will see from the description, it is more usual to to comment on who or what is doing the action so the ‘by. " phrase is excluded.

To begin, the clay (which) is used to make the bricks is dug up from the ground by a large digger. This clay is then placed onto a metal grid, onto a metal grid, which is used to break up the clay into smaller pieces. A roller assists in this process.

Following this, sand and water are added to the clay, and this mixture is turned into bricks by either placing it into a mould or using a wire cutter. Next, these bricks are placed in an oven to dry for 24 – 48 hours.

In the subsequent stage, the bricks go through a heating and cooling process. They are heated in a kiln at a moderate and then a high temperature (ranging from 200c to 1300c), followed by a cooling process in a chamber for 2 – 3 days. Finally, the bricks are packed and delivered to their destinations.

Varying your Language

Sometimes it may be appropriate just to use the same language that you are given in the IELTS process diagram to describe it, but you should try to vary it.

You may be able to use nouns from the diagram as your verbs. For example, the noun packaging in stage seven becomes:

Summary

Processes are not always this clear, and you may have to look more carefully to spot the beginning, and there may also be two things happening at the same time. A cyclical process, on the other hand, is a process that goes back to the beginning and repeats over and over again, such as the life cycle of a frog or a butterfly.

In the second paragraph, you should give a general description of the diagram/s or process. The detail comes later in the essay.

Resources:

https://www.ieltsadvantage.com/2015/07/13/ielts-writing-task-1-process-questions/
https://www.ieltsbuddy.com/ielts-process-diagram.html
https://www.ieltsjacky.com/ielts-process-diagram.html
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Homework Hacks: 8 Tips to Get It Done Faster

After all, both of these issues usually result in you putting off your homework until the very last minute.

You probably already have a to-do list to keep yourself on track. The next step is to prioritize the items on your to-do list so you can see what items need your attention right away.

Homework Hacks: 8 Tips to Get It Done Faster

Homework is no fun, especially if you’ve got a full schedule. You only have a little bit of time and a little bit of energy. And it takes so long to get through it.

Not anymore. We’ve got some helpful homework hacks for you that will make doing your homework faster and less painful.

1. Plan Your Homework and Make a List

When you start your homework, you’ll probably jump right into the first thing on your mind or the first thing you pull out of your backpack, then work your way through the rest of your assignments. There’s a better way.

Figure out how much time you have to do homework, then list out all the different tasks that you have to do. Estimate how long it will take to complete each assignment to see if you need to allow yourself more time. Be realistic. Once your list is complete you can work straight through instead of stopping frequently to figure out what to do next. It will also be extremely gratifying to cross things off after each assignment you finish!

2. Get Out All the Books and Supplies You Need

While you’re working, you discover you need a calculator, you need a certain book, you need a new pencil, you ran out of paper… the list can go on.

Since you’ve now identified all your assignments, figure out everything you need to get each item done and bring it to your workspace so it’s there when you need it.

3. Find a Quiet Place to Work Without Distractions

Speaking of workspace, you probably prefer doing your homework in front of the TV, but that can actually be the biggest distraction of all. Sitting in front of the TV is probably slowing you down, making homework time seem much longer that it actually is.

Find a place that’s quiet, with as few distractions and clutter possible. Remember, the faster you get it done, the faster you can get back to fully enjoying Netflix.

4. Turn Off Your Phone

We know this is probably the last thing you want to hear. How can you live without your phone? But for a couple hours, its totally worth it. Every time you get a notification and check your phone, it breaks your focus. It then takes more brain power to get back on track to what you were working on.

5. Listen to Classical Music While Working

However, classical music is great for background audio. There aren’t any lyrics or beats to distract your focus. And research has shown that students who listen to classical music score higher on tests than students who listen to other genres of music. So find some good classical playlist on Spotify, then celebrate with Queen Bey when you’re done.

6. Eat Snacks and Drink Water

At the end of a long day, you may be mentally and physically tired. If you go straight into homework it may take you a long time to finish and it won’t be your best work.

Having some light healthy snacks and drinking plenty of water helps revitalize your brain and body. Avoid soda, energy drinks, or sugary snacks that will only make you crash before you’re done.

7. Take Short Breaks in Between Homework Tasks

If you have a lot to do, you may feel the pressure to just work straight through hours and hours of homework. But this will likely end up slowing you down, prolonging the entire session.

Do your work in short sprints. Go hard at a task, then take a quick break to stretch and walk around. It’ll re-energize your mind and body to keep going. For starters, try working for 25 minutes, then taking a 5-minute break.

8. Reward Yourself After You’re Finished

Our brains work off of reward systems. If you give yourself a reward when finishing your homework, it makes it a lot easier to start your homework the next time and you’ll get through it faster. Rewards could be being able to watch a show, eat ice cream, play a game, or going out and doing something fun.

Now that you’ve got all these tips, go get your homework done faster than ever before. It may be hard at first, but keep using these tips and it’ll get easier as you go.

Plan Your Homework and Make a List

When you start your homework, you’ll probably jump right into the first thing on your mind or the first thing you pull out of your backpack, then work your way through the rest of your assignments. There’s a better way.

Figure out how much time you have to do homework, then list out all the different tasks that you have to do. Estimate how long it will take to complete each assignment to see if you need to allow yourself more time. Be realistic. Once your list is complete you can work straight through instead of stopping frequently to figure out what to do next. It will also be extremely gratifying to cross things off after each assignment you finish!

#3: Change Up Your Environment

Procrastination can also negatively affect your health by increasing your stress levels , which can lead to other health conditions like insomnia, a weakened immune system, and even heart conditions. To sum it up people who lack motivation to do their homework are more likely to not do it at all, or to spend more time worrying about doing their homework than.

So why does this technique work? Using small rewards more often allows you to experience small wins for getting your work done. Every time you make it to one of your tiny reward points, you get to celebrate your success, which gives your brain a boost of dopamine. Dopamine helps you stay motivated and also creates a feeling of satisfaction when you complete your homework!

Resources:

https://studelp.com/how-to-do-homework-fast-and-save-time.html

Homework Hacks: 8 Tips to Get It Done Faster


https://blog.prepscholar.com/how-to-do-homework
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Helping Students Write Effective Thesis Statements

Helping Students Write Effective Thesis Statements

All writers have had, at some point, difficulty locating and confidently stating their point of view—in other words, difficulty composing a well-stated thesis. For students composing writing for class, the reality of articulating their argument can be a particular challenge. Below, we offer some tips for instructors looking to help students find and state their argument confidently and convincingly.

Encourage your students to read, research, and prewrite to develop their point of view.

Writers often need to learn more about their topic before they can effectively state and support their position. Moreover, it is often helpful for writers to hold on taking a position before they research. Instead, they might explore the perspectives and approaches that already exist on their topic and position their argument based on what they find.

Remind students that a thesis usually has two parts: a statement of the writer’s point of view and a summary of the reasons/evidence the writer will draw on to develop that point of view.

It’s not uncommon to see a half-completed thesis statement–one that offers a claim but doesn’t pair that claim with any support. So readers are left knowing what the writer thinks about a topic without having a sense of why the writer thinks the way he or she does. We try to emphasize to writers that they must explain “why” they think they way they do about a given topic, issue, problem. Though many thesis statements don’t include the word “because,” a thesis using this word can serve as an example of answering the “why” part of the question. We sometimes use the example of a lawyer in court arguing on behalf of a client. Simply claiming that her client is innocent won’t be enough for the jury; the lawyer must also explain that her client is innocent because.

Writers can think of their thesis as a short summary of their entire essay—a summary that accounts for their position and their support for that position. In this way, a thesis serves as the essay’s road map, as something that can help guide the reader through the text.

Offer students examples of the kinds of arguments they can make in their essays.

Most academic writing contains some kind of argument, but the arguments can differ in both content and form. These differences are guided by genre conventions, disciplinary approaches, and by the writer’s individual goals. It is often useful to give your students examples of arguments that are acceptable and unacceptable for the assignment you’ve given them. More specifically, you may find yourself needing to talk about the types of evidence you want to see them use to support the arguments they are making—or the types of claims that are appropriate for the assignment.

On a related note, students might have problems differentiating a thesis statement that takes a clear position from a thesis statement that is, in reality, a statement of fact. To help writers make this distinction, we often ask them to consider whether their thesis has a counterargument—whether their thesis could be disagreed with or altered in some way.

Advise students to rewrite their thesis when they revise their essays.

Many writers need to draft an introduction, including a thesis, before they can feel comfortable moving to writing the body of their essay. But most writers discover their argument as they draft, so their initial introduction and thesis often don’t accurately foreground the body of the essay once the draft is complete. As a result, writers should think of their initial thesis as being in the “working” stage. They can also think about the kind of work their working thesis may do for them. Specifically, a thesis can guide the writer just as handily as it guides the reader. We like writers to be mindful of the argument they are trying to make as they compose, as this mindfulness helps them stay focused on providing relevant evidence and reasoning to support their argument.

We have some useful resources about writing thesis statements and making arguments.

Step 4: Refine your thesis statement

To help writers make this distinction, we often ask them to consider whether their thesis has a counterargument whether their thesis could be disagreed with or altered in some way. Remind students that a thesis usually has two parts a statement of the writer s point of view and a summary of the reasons evidence the writer will draw on to develop that point of view.

Shona has a bachelor’s and two master’s degrees, so she’s an expert at writing a great thesis. She has also worked as an editor and teacher, working with students at all different levels to improve their academic writing.

Resources:

https://wts.indiana.edu/writing-guides/how-to-write-a-thesis-statement.html
https://louisville.edu/writingcenter/faculty-folder/helping-students-write-effective-thesis-statements
https://www.scribbr.com/academic-essay/thesis-statement/
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